169

however brief, some would still,
occasionally, let the world
reveal itself as luminous.

190

increasingly he found himself
resting, like things,
in that twilight between.

 

 

168

and there were even times
when all that she could taste
was the bliss of an empty bowl of tea

167

her hesitation also
brought forth worlds.

 

189

walking along the path,
he looked up,
only to realize that he was moving
not through space,
but through himself.

 

 

166

and there were those too
who often without realizing it
took seat upon the remnants of light.

 

 

188

he sought endings where
only beginnings could be found.

 

 

165

those who remained with lowered gaze
had the opportunity to realize that their shadow
and hers were always one.

 

 

164

she wavered gently between,
so that one always had the choice
whether to drift or drown.

 

 

163

she forgot no one—
even the animals
traced her absence.

 

 

162

.

unassuming
all flowed into her.

.

.

187

no tower of babel was required. he understood nothing anyone said
in any language. not even any of the nonsense he himself continually
spewed. but, dumbfounded,might this not have been a heaven too?

 

 

186

his was the surest of paths,
futility never needed to be sought.

.
.

161

some sought within.
others sought without.
neither, however, seemed to notice
that limits themselves could be luminous.

.
.

185

mornings would always elude him
—there was simply no awakening.

.
.

160

.
“1…2…3…” silently, to themselves,
they counted how many steps it would take
until they would  be washed away.

.
.

184

.
some sought symbols,
but found only things.
others sought things,
but found only symbols.
he, however, remained unsure
and would not settle for either.

.
.

159

.
.
by withdrawing she would
allow one to trawl
the otherwise inaccessible.

.
.

158

.

obscure,
her crossings.

the most sure
forever indiscernible.

.
.

183

.

he suspected that he had entered a new phase
one in which it would appear that nothing,
absolutely nothing, had changed.

.
.